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In Islamabad, getting rid of the litter problem might not be easy

An edited version of this article was first published in The Express Tribnne on Jan 4, 2013. Islamabad – In the Karachi Company market in sector G-9, litter is a common sight. Plastic bags, wrappers, juice boxes and discarded packing material from fruit and vegetable crates line the pavement edges outside the shops and the […]

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Pakistani trekkers share adventure experiences

An edited version of this article was first published in The Express Tribune on Dec 31, 2o12. Islamabad – The view from the top of the 5,940-metre Gondogoro Pass must have made Atif Mukhtar and his fellow trekkers forget the fatigue of their trek. For the final stages of the ascent, they had to wade […]

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Solar power in Rural Sindh

An edited version of this article was first published in The Express Tribune on Dec 26, 2012. Islamabad – There are no transmission lines or power grids near Ameer’s village. But two years ago, his coastal community of 23 households near the Arabian Sea got electricity for the first time. It arrived in the form […]

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Reduced flows hurting Indus Delta

This article was first published in The Express Tribune on Dec 25, 2012. Islamabad – Until the late 19th century, the Indus Delta boasted of a thick mangrove plantation. The forests in the delta were so lush that there were even reports of an ‘Indus Tiger’ on the prowl within its recesses. This description provided […]

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Jhimpir’s Wind Farms

An edited version of this article was first published in The Express Tribune on Dec 24, 2012. Jhimpir/Karachi – Driving from Karachi to the Nooriabad Industrial Area, it is hard not to notice a constant feature to the left side of the Super Highway. Transmission lines sag between evenly spaced towers along the road for several […]

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